Water

Where would we be without it?

Earth isn’t called the Water Planet for nothing—an abundance of water and the right temperatures to make it available separate us from any other place we know of in the universe. Yet, the oceanic ecosystem is struggling, droughts are looming, groundwater is being depleted, and our energy addictions fuel water pollution from the Gulf of Mexico to the Dineh reservation to the Amazon, and the climate change that will affect water supplies everywhere.

Stream in the Smoky Mountains, a temperate rainforest - for now...

Water = life on earth

 

Accessible water sets Planet Earth apart from every other planet we have discovered—in the universe. Water covers a majority of the planet's surface, and while only 3 percent of this is fresh water—and two-thirds of that is locked up as ice in the polar regions or in glaciers—there’s still plenty to sustain life.

But this life-giving liquid is in jeopardy from human activity

 

Clean Water

 

Over 800 million people in the world don't have ready access to clean water, and some three times this number have inadequate sanitation. As a result, 9000 children die every day from causes related to impure water. In the USA, water is increasingly imperiled by hydraulic

fracking in search of oil and natural gas. Unlike other water used by the energy sector, this water contains so many chemicals and other impurities that it is lost for other purposes—such as drinking or irrigating crops.

One fracking well can use—and foul—as much as 30 million gallons of water, and there will be a million more wells in the next 20 years. And see what fracking is doing to the Dine' reservation in New Mexico!

 

​​Climate Change

 

As the climate warms and becomes less stable, it will affect rainfall patterns, drenching some areas with more rain than ever, while creating some 50,000 square miles of new desert every year. These weather-related "natural disasters" threaten the well-being of 135 million people in 100 countries—and are predicted to create tens of millions of environmental refugees in the coming decades. Low-lying areas, such as coastal regions of South Asia, are already being affected by rising sea levels and drought, resulting in climate refugees in Vietnam; the same can be said for Central Americans fleeing toward the US border. Meanwhile, Greenland will shed 400 billion tons of ice into the North Atlantic this year, four times the rate of a decade earlier.

 

Overuse and Pollution

 

In the US, we're over-pumping our aquifers (underground reservoirs of water) by 3.2 billion gallons a day. The Ogallala Aquifer, irrigating one-fifth of the US grain crop, is dropping by 12 billion cubic meters a year. A leading cause is meat consumption, as it can take nearly 2000 gallons of water to irrigate the grain to produce 1 pound of beef. In other parts of the world, water sources are even more imperiled. In India, Coca-Cola bottling plants for soft drinks and water cause aquifers to drop dramatically. Water privatization is also an issue in many areas, as corporations try to capture the market on this precious resource.

 

Primarily due to agricultural run-off (farm waste and fertilizers) and burning fossil fuels, there are over 400 "dead zones" in the world's seas and oceans—including in the Chesapeake Bay and Gulf of Mexico—places so oxygen-depleted that sea life cannot live there. In addition, mercury levels in the oceans have risen precipitously during the industrial era, adding this toxin to the human food chain.

 

 

Over-acidification

 

Another form of pollution is the over-acidification of the world’s oceans due to CO2 absorption. The resulting carbonic acid prevents shellfish from forming shells and threatens the survival of coral reefs.

 

Finally, there's simply trash. The oceans have become a repository for all manner of waste—especially plastics—to the point that there are now some 46,000 pieces of plastic per square mile. Most of this originates on land, not from boats and ships. It's said that by 2050, there will be as much plastic in the oceans as fish.

 

Bottled water

 

US consumers purchase 30 billion bottles of water per year, spending over $20 billion. Producing them required 17 million barrels of oil; then we throw away 60 million every day. The UN Millennium Goals ask for $15 billion a year to cut in half the number of people in the world who don't have clean water. Go figure.

Want to keep the water flowing? 

  • Think outside the bottle! Join campaigns to assure clean water for all—or start your own, like these girls from Bali did, to prevent plastic pollution of our oceans. Meanwhile, the world spends over $300 billion annually on bottled water—the majority of this in the Rich World where other sources of clean water are readily available. Resist!

  • Stuff – consuming less stuff saves water (making a car=over 40,000 gallons; producing 1 gallon gas=18 gallons; 12 ounces soda=60 ounces of water; one pound paper=10 pounds water) ; pair of jeans=1500 gallons

  • Stuff II – recycling paper, aluminum, plastic and glass saves up to 80% of the energy, water and pollution

  • Diet – if US'ers cut meat consumption by half, we'd save 14 Colorado Rivers' worth of water and stop a lot of water pollution! (the average US meat-based diet requires 1350 gallons of water per day!)

  • Diet II – eating organic foods keeps fertilizers out of waterways and uses 30-50% less energy

  • Just Don’t Do It – the most heavily irrigated crop in US? lawn grass, with 25 million acres under irrigation (golf courses use 4 billion gallons per day in US). Take advantage of NCP's Lawns to Ladybugs program to turn lawn into habitat (we offer grants!)

  • Energy – conserving energy reduces acid rain and water usage (generating 1 kilowatt requires 2 gallons of water); climate change is the greatest threat to the world's water supply

  • Conserve – preserving forests safeguards water cycles and water supplies. Support NCP's Million Tree Campaign!

  • Calculate your own daily water consumption here.

  • Join us on a Learning Tour to the Amazon, Alaska, Burma, Malawi or other places where this key resource is at issue—or imperiled​

 

Ponds of toxic waste from the oil industry in the Ecuadorian Amazon rainforest - the headwaters of the mighty Amazon river. The USA imports 200,000 barrels of oil each day from Ecuador - this is what is left behind.

Recent studies have shown that mountaintop glaciers in the Himalaya are melting much more rapidly that previously thought. About half of the world's people—including millions in the American Southwest—depend on snow melt for dry-season water supply. 

Sources: The World's Water, Peter Gleick; Earth Under Fire , Gary Braasch; The Omnivore's Dilemma, Michael Pollan; UNDP; State of the World 2004, World Watch Institute; Earth Policy Institute; United Nations Environment Program

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New Community Project

...turning the world upside down...

Building a new community of justice and peace

for our neighbors and respect for the earth.

Contact:​

847-910-4636 cell

844-804-2985 toll-free

David Radcliff - Director

540-433-2363

Tom Benevento - Coordinator

Harrisonburg, VA Sustainable Living Center

802-434-2333

Pete Antos-Ketcham - Coordinator 

Starksboro, VT Sustainable Living Center

Email: 

ncp@newcommunityproject.org

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Blue Ridge, VA 24064

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